Caffeine Level: High

Tea Type: Dark Tea

Ingredients: Dark Tea, rose petals

ORIGIN:

China

THE STORY OF DARK ROSE

Dark Tea (Hei Cha) production dates to 1500s, also known in China as Bian Xiao Cha (Border-Sale tea) as it is normally sold in the border regions. Dark tea undergoes an aging process where the bacteria reacts and changes the chemistry, flavor, and aroma of the leaves. It contains an active microorganism called Golden Flowers (Eurotium Cristatum) this microorganism is present specifically in the Dark tea made in Anhua region.

This dark rose heart is made by blending Tian Jian dark tea from the Xue Feng mountain in Anhua, Hunan combined with edible roses from Pinyin county in Shandong (famous for its roses) creating a delicious tea in the shape of a heart. While Dark tea is a fermented tea, it is not the same as Pu-erh tea. The Pu-erh tea is only produced in Yunnan Province, the main characteristics of Pu-erh tea are the earthy aroma and flavor. Dark tea, on the other hand, comes from the province of Hunan, this tea is lighter and sweeter than Pu-erh. Both teas are intentionally aged, but dark tea is not aged for extended periods of time as Pu-erh.

A LEGEND OF ORIGINS:

There is a legend around this tea that says that this beautiful heart-shaped tea has its origins in the Tang Dynasty (618-907). Princess Wencheng was married to a Tibetan ruler to settle a border war. The princess prepared some Anhua dark tea and rose petals accidentally mixed with the leaves. The surprisingly pleasant taste inspired in her a sense of peace and acceptance of her role.

Dark tea undergoes an aging process where the bacteria reacts and changes the chemistry, flavor, and aroma of the leaves.
Earthy notes with predominant rose aroma
There is a legend around this tea that says that this beautiful heart-shaped tea has its origins in the Tang Dynasty
Great to pair with dark chocolate

THE STORY OF DARK ROSE

Dark Tea (Hei Cha) production dates to 1500s, also known in China as Bian Xiao Cha (Border-Sale tea) as it is normally sold in the border regions. Dark tea undergoes an aging process where the bacteria reacts and changes the chemistry, flavor, and aroma of the leaves. It contains an active microorganism called Golden Flowers (Eurotium Cristatum) this microorganism is present specifically in the Dark tea made in Anhua region.

Read More

This dark rose heart is made by blending Tian Jian dark tea from the Xue Feng mountain in Anhua, Hunan combined with edible roses from Pinyin county in Shandong (famous for its roses) creating a delicious tea in the shape of a heart. While Dark tea is a fermented tea, it is not the same as Pu-erh tea. The Pu-erh tea is only produced in Yunnan Province, the main characteristics of Pu-erh tea are the earthy aroma and flavor. Dark tea, on the other hand, comes from the province of Hunan, this tea is lighter and sweeter than Pu-erh. Both teas are intentionally aged, but dark tea is not aged for extended periods of time as Pu-erh.

A LEGEND OF ORIGINS:

There is a legend around this tea that says that this beautiful heart-shaped tea has its origins in the Tang Dynasty (618-907). Princess Wencheng was married to a Tibetan ruler to settle a border war. The princess prepared some Anhua dark tea and rose petals accidentally mixed with the leaves. The surprisingly pleasant taste inspired in her a sense of peace and acceptance of her role.

Preparation Instructions

Smiley face 12 fl oz Smiley face 195-205 F
Smiley face 1 piece Smiley face 2-3 mins

 

 

The Experience

DRY LEAVES

Aroma – Dusty rose aroma
Appearance –The leaves are pressed into a heart shape.

 

LIQUOR

Aroma-Earthy notes with predominant rose aroma
Appearance-Amber color liquor
Taste –Warming and earthy flavor, with floral notes due to the rose, providing a hint of sweetness

Tea Time

Ideas for a good time with this tea

Seasoning

Better consumed by itself

Pairing

Pairs great with dark chocolate

Best Consumed

Hot

Best Time of Day

A good option for your morning tea

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